Tag: #bookreviewblog

Siege and Storm by Leigh Bardugo Review

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I finally read Siege and Storm. I’ve wanted to move on with this series for a minute, but I kept procrastinating. Unfortunately, after reading Siege and Storm, I’m not sure if I want to continue this series. Let’s get into my review.

Alina and Mal have fled the Fold, but darkness still haunts them. The Darkling survived that monumental day on the Fold and brought a new power with him. With the help of a charming privateer, Alina chases her new destiny. As her power grows, her connection to Mal suffers. She will have to decide if she wants to save her country, or lose everything she has ever loved.

Ugh, the angst. The whole book was focused around the angst between Mal and Alina. Even during major events. Mal was almost never off of Alina’s mind. Plus, there is a possible love triangle, or square, developing. Let’s just say Alina has a lot of options. It was all very dramatic.

After getting past the angst, the story is mostly filler. A few new characters and plot points were introduced, but it mostly felt like filler to start the next book.

I was disappointed by this. It didn’t give me the sequel I wanted. I loved Shadow and Bone, but Siege and Storm wasn’t great. But it did set up an interesting power change for the last book. I might continue on with the series just to see how it plays out.

My Rating: 2/5

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The Wife Upstairs by Rachel Hawkins Review

The Wife Upstairs was one of my most anticipated winter releases. When I saw it as a December Book of the Month choice I had to have it. It was my last read of 2020, and it was a great way to end the year.

The new dog walker is all anyone in Thornfield Estates can talk about. Her name is Jane and she is new to Birmingham, Alabama. None of her wealthy clients notice that jewelry and trinkets disappear after Jane’s arrival. That’s because no one notices Jane outside of her dog walking duty. That is until she meets Eddie Rochester. He is Thornfield Estates mysterious new widower. All Jane sees in Eddie is opportunity. An opportunity to enter the lifestyle of the wealthy and to finally have the protection she craves. However, only on thing stand in her way. The presence of Eddie’s wife Bea still haunts the home even after her mysterious disappearance.

My Thoughts on The Wife Upstairs

The Wife Upstairs is an imaginative retelling of Jane Eyre. Hawkins done a great job capturing the gothic feel of Jane Eyre in a modern setting. That in itself is impressive.

Hawkins also managed to make characters that were likable and loathable at the same time. Most of them were not great people, but their motives made sense. I knew that Jane was super manipulative, but I still wanted the situation to go her way. The juxtaposition of those two feelings really grasped my attention.

Lastly, the mystery was well thought out. It kept me guessing almost the entire time. And I lovedddd the plot twist. I never saw it coming. There had to be a tiny bit of suspension of belief at the end, but all-in-all I completely loved it.

My Rating: 5/5

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The Invisible Life of Addie Larue by V. E. Schwab Review

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The Invisible Life of Addie Larue has to be one of the most hyped books of 2020. It has been everywhere. However, when I first started it in October, I put it down. I found it very slow. I picked it back up this month, and I’m glad I did. Let’s get into my final thoughts.

France 1714: a young woman makes a hasty bargain to live forever. However, she will be forgotten by everyone she meets. Thus begins the tale of Addie Larue. She will travel across centuries trying to leave a mark on the world that doesn’t know her name. But after 300 years things suddenly change when she meets a man that remembers her.

My Thoughts on The Invisible Life of Addie Larue

Like I said at the beginning, this book is slow. It’s very character-driven and that takes some time to build. But the writing is gorgeous. Every sentence V.E. Schwab writes is decadent. You will find yourself longing for the river banks of France.

The story picks up when Addie meets Henry. I love his character arc. He added a lot of depth to the plot, which I think was his purpose. I don’t want to say that there was a lot of monotony in Addie’s arc, but there definitely was. It didn’t matter how many centuries she lived her story was always the same. I believe that was Schwab’s intention because meeting Henry felt like a jarring experience that changed everything.

Another character that intrigued me was Luc. I would love to know more about him. He fabricated this whole thing, and I want to know his thought process.

Overall, The Invisible Life of Addie Larue was a beautiful read. It was a twisty, tricky story of the intertwined lives of the main characters. Beauty and heartache permeated every detail. There was also hope and love throughout. If you can overlook the slow development, it is worth the read.

My Rating: 4/5

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Sister Margaret Review

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I love a good crime story and Sister Margaret is just that. Thank you to Bully Press for giving me a copy in exchange for my honest review.

Tommy Keane has been a detective in the Bronx for years. When Tommy gets in a little trouble, he is transferred to the 21st Precinct in Manhattan. He expects an easy ride, but then a beloved nun is found brutally murdered. Even a seasoned detective is surprised by this motive.

My Thoughts on Sister Margaret

Sister Margaret was a good read. However, it was to the point, which isn’t necessarily a bad thing. There wasn’t a ton of back story or filler content to bog the crime aspect down. I appreciated that.

Although, I would like to learn more about Tommy. There were glimpses of his life, but no answered questions. Since it’s the start of the series, I expect there will be more of his backstory to come. I also really liked his mother, so I hope she’s included in the next one.

The crime was pretty horrifying, but believable. I believe one of the authors was a detective. You can tell by the details that the authors know what they are talking about.

I did start to piece together the motive, but I was wrong about the perpetrator. It ended up being even darker than I expected. It was a heartbreaking case. There were a lot of emotions at the end. Sister Margaret is a pretty solid crime fiction novel. I look forward to reading more.

My Rating: 4/5

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The Sadeiest by Austrian Spencer

Today I’m participating in the book tour for The Sadeiest. I have to say in advance that this is quite possibly the most disturbing book I’ve ever read. It’s not for the squeamish. Let’s jump into the review.

What is our perceived notion of death is wrong? What if it isn’t what we imagined at all? Maybe death actually dies for us instead of silently watching on. Death pays for his sin by dying again and again. William is a Sadeiest. William is death. He dies daily, but he also saves the trapped souls of people. He is thrown into this world with very little training. What he doesn’t know is that his destiny is so much bigger than he ever imagined.

My Thoughts on The Sadeiest

Firstly, I have to say I’m blown away by the author’s imagination. The Sadeiest is so unique. A lot of thought went into the development of the world and magic system.

I expected this to be a dark read. I was definitely right. It was extremely gruesome and graphic. And it was gritty and dark. It will be great for the toughest of horror lovers. It’s definitely darker than what I’m used to, but I can respect the storyline.

If you’re looking for a terrifying, unique horror novel this one is for you.

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Don’t forget to check out the rest of the blog tour! Thanks to Rachel’s Random Resources for the opportunity to participate.


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The Butterfly Effect by Rachel Mans McKenny Review

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The Butterfly Effect is out of my normal comfort zone, but it was what I needed in the moment. I jumped in after reading Darkdawn and it felt like a breath of fresh air. Let’s get to the review.

Greta Oto is not a social butterfly. She is nowhere close. She tends to prefer the company of bugs to humans. When her twin brother Danny is hospitalized, due to an aneurysm, she has to give up a lifetime research gig. When she comes home she has to face the people she has been avoiding for years. Through it all, Greta works on completing her dissertation, and she might even learn a little about the people in her life.

My Thoughts on The Butterfly Effect

Let me start by saying, Greta is the most infuriating character that I have ever met. But don’t let that scare you away from The Butterfly Effect. This book brings out so many emotions, especially anger. As annoying as Greta was, I could feel the hidden depths of her emotions. Greta had been hurt many times in the past, so she used her personality as a defense mechanism. It doesn’t excuse her behavior, but it made me understand it.

Another thing I enjoyed was the depiction of a family health crisis. My family has been through some health problems and it can feel isolating at times. It was interesting to watch how the characters reacted to similar situations. Everyone handles things differently and I enjoyed seeing a new perspective.

Lastly, Greta’s character growth is great. Toward the end you can tell she is trying to improve herself. I really appreciated that part. I also liked the slight hint of romance. It was refreshing.

All in all, this was a great read. It was real. It was raw. And it was what I needed in the moment.

My Rating: 4/5

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Thanks to the author for gifting me a copy of The Butterfly Effect in exchange for my honest opinion!

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The Haunting of Ashburn House by Darcy Coates Review

I wanted to read something scary for Halloween. I have read a lot of spooky books, but nothing actually scary. So on our way in from vacation I stopped and grabbed The Haunting of Ashburn House. It was everything that I wanted The Haunting of Hill House to be.

Ashburn House has been the talk of the town for years. The owner, Edith, wouldn’t allow visitors. The town talked from afar. After she passed, her niece, Adrienne, was her sole heir. Adrienne doesn’t believe in ghosts, but it’s hard to deny their existence at Ashburn House. As she learns more about the house she begins to believe that something has unfinished business.

My Thoughts on The Haunting of Ashburn House

The Haunting of Ashburn House is not for the squeamish. There are some very creepy scenes. It begins like a lot of ghost stories. The main character lost her job and Ashburn House is her only option. A few of her aunt’s creepy possessions linger. They set off the ominous feeling perfectly.

Then the tension begins to build. It starts a little slow, but then it picks up nicely. The deeper in the book I read the more unsettled I became.

Further into the book, the main character started making questionable choices. However, she acknowledged her dumb choices. I kind of enjoyed that. It made it a little less infuriating.

The mystery surrounding the original family was well thought out. I loved the way the author used newspaper articles, letters, and other documents to make her big reveals. I’ve always enjoyed it when an author does that.

By the ending I couldn’t put the book down. It was so fast-paced and terrifying, but I also needed answers. The conclusion was satisfying and quirky. The Haunting of Ashburn House was just what I needed to get into the Halloween mood.

My Rating: 5/5

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