Disappointing Books of 2020

Yesterday, I shared some of my favorite books of 2020. Today, I’m talking about my disappointing books of 2020. It was a great reading year, but unfortunately there were still some that I didn’t enjoy. Keep in mind that this is personal opinion. I don’t think they are bad books, but they didn’t work for me.

American Vampire

Synopsis:

This volume follows two stories: one written by Snyder and one written by King. Snyder’s story is set in 1920’s LA, we follow Pearl, a young woman who is turned into a vampire and sets out on a path of righteous revenge against the European Vampires who tortured and abused her. This story is paired with King’s story, a western about Skinner Sweet, the original American Vampire– a stronger, faster creature than any vampire ever seen before with rattlesnake fangs and powered by the sun.

I have no clue what happened in this. It was all a vague blur. I expected to love it because I love Stephen King. Unfortunately, it was one of the most disappointing books of 2020.

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Wytches

Synopsis:

Everything you thought you knew about witches is wrong. They are much darker, and they are much more horrifying. Wytches takes the mythology of witches to a far creepier, bone-chilling place than readers have dared venture before.

When the Rooks family moves to the remote town of Litchfield, NH to escape a haunting trauma, they’re hopeful about starting over. But something evil is waiting for them in the woods just beyond town. Watching from the trees. Ancient…and hungry.

I felt the same way about this one. I feel like I missed part of the story and the art work was distracting.

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The Boy from the Woods

Synopsis:

A man with a mysterious past must find a missing teenage girl in this shocking thriller from the #1 New York Times bestselling author of Run Away.

Thirty years ago, Wilde was found as a boy living feral in the woods, with no memory of his past. Now an adult, he still doesn’t know where he comes from, and another child has gone missing.

No one seems to take Naomi Pine’s disappearance seriously, not even her father-with one exception. Hester Crimstein, a television criminal attorney, knows through her grandson that Naomi was relentlessly bullied at school. Hester asks Wilde-with whom she shares a tragic connection-to use his unique skills to help find Naomi.

Wilde can’t ignore an outcast in trouble, but in order to find Naomi he must venture back into the community where he has never fit in, a place where the powerful are protected even when they harbor secrets that could destroy the lives of millions . . . secrets that Wilde must uncover before it’s too late.

I was really disappointed in this. It was one of my most anticipated books of 2020. However, the title was misleading. Wilde just happened to be from the woods. There was very little talk about that. Somehow, it turned out to be about a fictional political race. And I’m super tired of politics.

My Full Review

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The Whole Town’s Talking

The Whole Town's Talking|Fannie Flagg

Synopsis:

Elmwood Springs, Missouri, is a small town like any other, but something strange is happening at the cemetery. Still Meadows, as it’s called, is anything but still. Original, profound, The Whole Town’s Talking, a novel in the tradition of Thornton Wilder’s Our Town and Flagg’s own Can’t Wait to Get to Heaven, tells the story of Lordor Nordstrom, his Swedish mail-order bride, Katrina, and their neighbors and descendants as they live, love, die, and carry on in mysterious and surprising ways.

Lordor Nordstrom created, in his wisdom, not only a lively town and a prosperous legacy for himself but also a beautiful final resting place for his family, friends, and neighbors yet to come. “Resting place” turns out to be a bit of a misnomer, however. Odd things begin to happen, and it starts the whole town talking.

I liked the concept of this one, but the execution wasn’t great. I just wasn’t impressed.

My Full Review

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The Southern Book Club’s Guide to Slaying Vampires

Synopsis:

Patricia Campbell’s life has never felt smaller. Her husband is a workaholic, her teenage kids have their own lives, her senile mother-in-law needs constant care, and she’s always a step behind on her endless to-do list. The only thing keeping her sane is her book club, a close-knit group of Charleston women united by their love of true crime. At these meetings they’re as likely to talk about the Manson family as they are about their own families.

One evening after book club, Patricia is viciously attacked by an elderly neighbor, bringing the neighbor’s handsome nephew, James Harris, into her life. James is well traveled and well read, and he makes Patricia feel things she hasn’t felt in years. But when children on the other side of town go missing, their deaths written off by local police, Patricia has reason to believe James Harris is more of a Bundy than a Brad Pitt. The real problem? James is a monster of a different kind–and Patricia has already invited him in.

Little by little, James will insinuate himself into Patricia’s life and try to take everything she took for granted–including the book club–but she won’t surrender without a fight in this blood-soaked tale of neighborly kindness gone wrong.

I wanted to love this, but it read like a cheesy horror movie. The main character made some of the worst choices. Plus, I didn’t like the vampire that was depicted. I just want a good old-fashioned vampire with fangs. Is that too much to ask for?

My Full Review

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So that wraps up my disappointing books of 2020. Did you read any disappointing books this year?


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