E. Shaver Book Sellers Haul

Today I am on the road home from the best vacation. My husband and I spent the weekend in Savannah, Georgia and I am love with it.

When we left home the corona virus scare had not hit our part of the country. While we were gone there were a few confirmed cases in our state. There still are not many cases but the panic is real. Schools have shut down and people are beginning to self isolate. It is weird that so much has changed in the short time that we were gone. Luckily, while we were in Savannah I stopped at E. Shaver Booksellers. So I am stocked up on reading goodies.

Synopsis:

2000. Bright, ambitious, and yearning for adulthood, fifteen-year-old Vanessa Wye becomes entangled in an affair with Jacob Strane, her magnetic and guileful forty-two-year-old English teacher.

2017. Amid the rising wave of allegations against powerful men, a reckoning is coming due. Strane has been accused of sexual abuse by a former student, who reaches out to Vanessa, and now Vanessa suddenly finds herself facing an impossible choice: remain silent, firm in the belief that her teenage self willingly engaged in this relationship, or redefine herself and the events of her past. But how can Vanessa reject her first love, the man who fundamentally transformed her and has been a persistent presence in her life? Is it possible that the man she loved as a teenager—and who professed to worship only her—may be far different from what she has always believed?

Alternating between Vanessa’s present and her past, My Dark Vanessa juxtaposes memory and trauma with the breathless excitement of a teenage girl discovering the power her own body can wield. Thought-provoking and impossible to put down, this is a masterful portrayal of troubled adolescence and its repercussions that raises vital questions about agency, consent, complicity, and victimhood. Written with the haunting intimacy of The Girls and the creeping intensity of Room, My Dark Vanessa is an era-defining novel that brilliantly captures and reflects the shifting cultural mores transforming our relationships and society itself.

This book is everywhere right now. When I walked in I saw it on the shelf and grabbed it without a thought.

Synopsis:

All cemeteries are history made tangible. Each neatly laid out plot, each lichen-dotted headstone, each lovingly crafted monument, is a representation of a personal history. While each cemetery has its own collection of stories to tell, Bonaventure Cemetery has more stories than most. For more than 150 years, citizens of Savannah have buried their loved ones at Bonaventure Cemetery. Among its grounds, monuments bearing the names of such famous people as Johnny Mercer lie alongside markers bearing names of those known only to their family. Bonaventure’s stately beauty seems the perfect setting for a cemetery. Historic Bonaventure Cemetery illustrates the development of Bonaventure as a Victorian-style cemetery and the
transformation from a private estate to a public cemetery. Historic Bonaventure Cemetery, the first book solely about Bonaventure, includes images of Bonaventure and Greenwich―the two plantations that became Bonaventure―and provides information about the people and the monuments there

Bonaventure was on our list to visit. I wanted a little more of the history of the cemetery so I picked this up. It was a great guide to the cemetery.

I adore this little bookmark. It features the friendly shop cats that hang around.

I had to have a sticker for my bullet journal.

This was an impulse buy. It smelled so good. It’s also supper moisturizing.

My husband bought me these cute little star tabs. I adore them.

I’m excited to try this Mexican style chocolate.

If you’re in Savannah, I highly recommend visiting E. Shaver! While you’re there stop into the tea shop that is attached to it. You can have a pot of tea brewed while you read and you can buy some to bring home.

I have more Savannah fun coming this week! Subscribe so you don’t miss it.

https://www.eshaverbooks.com/home

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